False Assumptions About Social Media Influencers

Here’s a list of problems I once had with social media influencers v. my paradigm shift on their role in social marketing.

they’re self obsessed

It’s not for no reason that influencers have to be confident and appearance-minded people. It’s their job. If they seem a little into themselves, that’s only because it’s a part of their personality to naturally look nice and/or be nice. It’s already who they are! Also, there are a ton of influencers who don’t necessarily come across as self obsessed on screen. Take Trey Kennedy. He’s funny and has a huge following, but he wears T-shirts, and that doesn’t come across as self-obsessed. He comes across as goofy. Sure, he has a special light on his phone in selfie-mode, but that doesn’t have to mean he’s obsessed about his looks. Maybe he does that because he’s passionate and wants to up his production game. Of course, this doesn’t mean Social Media Influencers should all wear t-shirts to come across humble or casual. But it does say they aren’t all internally hyper-obsessed with themselves. In fact, I like to think of Trey’s t-shirt as the part of him that wants to not be self-obsessed. It’s as though so much of his life is based around him as the talent that if he could take some of the attention away in say, wearing a t-shirt, he’d do it. And it’s working. The guy gets promotional work all the time.

Did you know that people rely on influencers for product recommendations? According to research conducted by Annalect and Twitter 49% of people said this to be true.

If you need help growing your brand and bringing awareness of your product to your target customer, there’s almost no better way to do it than with influencer marketing.

At Caffeine, we can help you do that.

They Have Millions of Followers

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Influencers don’t all have to have millions of followers to be successful and earn an income. In fact, they can have a following starting at about 1000. Of course, they will still have to keep their day job, but earning a small bit of extra cash can be a reality for these micro-influencers. Because when they have fewer followers, micro-influencers are relatable in a unique way: they can mimic the every-day customer. The outcome is that relatable influencer marketing will lead to more engagement and hopefully more sales.

Micro-influencers are becoming increasing more popular. While their rates are typically smaller, their impact is still massive. That’s why at Caffeine we mostly work with micro-influencers that can sponsor your product or service in a relatable way.

Here are 10 other tips for creating organic social media growth.

they lucked upon it

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Almost no one simply lucks into their dream job. Period. It does happen, but honestly, becoming an influencer is just like any other role in the entertainment industry - it just takes a lot of hard, consistent work to get there. You’re constantly creating good content that people want to read or watch. You’re constantly thinking about your life in pictures, stories and video edits. It’s a lot of creating, writing and a lot of planning. It’s sacrificing time and money to get better and better content out there for the audience. Those videos and pics don’t just happen, y’all. If luck is a part of the equation, it’s a small part. Being an influencer is all about the hustle.

Take it from actual influencers interviewed on manrepeller.com. A couple of the women interviewed mention that they were bloggers long before they were ever successful influencers. These are people that put time and effort into growing their brand and gaining a following so one day they might get paid to promote yours (in addition to their own).

One example of a way you can partner with influencers is through give-aways. A giveaway can help you create brand awareness, authentic engagement, gain new followers, and much more. The benefit of an influencer gives-away is they promote your product or service in repayment for the followers they receive by promoting your brand. Influencers are likely to work with you if your company already has the type or followers, product or service that would benefit their brand as well. That’s because their followers are likely to follow you and maybe even buy from you (and vice versa) once they’ve posted the give away item. It’s an easy way for both of you to win in marketing.

Want to learn more about adding hype to your product or service?

they don’t have any other hobbies

We all have a friends who have big followings on SoMe. From the outside they seem to only post post post all the time - no stopping, no going, just posting. And I viewed that as a purely unhealthy and bad thing. Then, one day I had this realization - What the heck do I do to contribute to the world? Even if SoMe is the only thing an influencer does for work or my friends do for fun - besides their day jobs and private life stuff - what the heck is wrong with that? Why can’t SoMe be a person’s side gig or main hobby. Most of us don’t have hobbies at all let alone ones where we contribute entertaining or instructional content to the world. I watch their content, like it and respond, and then I judge them for posting all the time. AHH My judgement of them is a me problem. Not a them problem.

In addition, it might seem like running their social media accounts like a business would be shallow, but like anything else it’s all about the heart and the motivation. I don’t have rights to judging people’s very motivation. What people do with their free time is their own decision - not mine. Of course like anything else there’s a balance that comes into play. @Kevonstage is a comedian and influencer on Instagram and he posts jokes and lifestyle videos pretty consistently. It makes me think about how the rest of his life is impacted when SoMe is his full-time job. Does he have other hobbies? Is he a well-rounded person that takes care of himself and the things around him well? And then as if on perfect timing he posts a video of himself at the gym, and I think thank goodness he takes care of himself.

I know it’s a small thing, but when influencers write or post about their other hobbies, I get the solace that the voice I listen too actually has other things in their life. The main point is I want to follow people that are well-rounded in their life and in their work. And when an influencer has that it makes me feel better for contributing (as the audience) to their very livelihood. I have learned that the moments in their lives that are pictured are similar to mine - they’re just public. And that’s okay just as long as they’re achieving healthy human status.

they’re perfect and have it all together aka they’re not real people

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This one goes without saying, but it’s always good to read: no one is perfect. You see these guys and gals, sporting their products and sharing their insights, creating laughs and memorable moments. They seem like they have it all together, but that’s just moments in their life - moments for which they’re getting paid. They’re working. Yes, they’re being themselves, but they’re also being the best, most pristine version of themselves - that’s the job. They don’t have it all together. None of us do. In fact, now that I’ve crossed over to being pro-social influencer as a job, I’ve realized that between influencers and celebrities, influencers are more relatable.

One study found YouTube influencers specifically to be more influential than traditional celebrities. The study claims that “because YouTube creators foster strong ties with fans, they have a more engaged audience.” It says that YT “creators earn more views, more actions and more comments than videos owned by traditional celebrities”. And that’s just YouTube.

Imagine what an authentic voice with thousands of followers could do for your business.

If you want to do learn more, press the button and fill out the form. We’ll chat about how social media marketing can help you win in business.

Tanna Bagwell
Intern for Social Media
tanna@caffeine.marketing